Families of Ethiopia plane crash victims storm out of meeting with airline

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Indonesian investigators have not stated a cause for the Lion Air crash, but are examining whether faulty readings from a sensor might have triggered an automatic nose-down command to the plane, which the Lion Air pilots fought unsuccessfully to overcome.

The airline said on Twitter that an Ethiopian delegation had flown the black boxes from flight ET 302 to Paris for investigation.

This comes after 149 passengers and eight crew members died when their plane crashed six minutes after taking off from Ethiopia's capital, Addis Ababa, on a flight to Nairobi on Sunday. In fact, the flight lost it because I didn't give a suitcase (otherwise they would expect me for 10-15 minutes or more, because finding a suitcase loaded wants at least 40 minutes).

There is no evidence yet whether the two crashes are linked. The drop has lopped $26.65 billion (£20 billion) off Boeing's market value.

In the wake of the crash, Ethiopia, China, Indonesia, Singapore, Australia and South Africa have so far grounded the Boeing 737 Max 8, the model of the plane that crashed. "What we can say is we don't have the capability to probe it here in Ethiopia", he said.

The new enhancement is allegedly created to make the aircraft even safer.

"We don't know what next", he told CP24 in a phone interview from Kenya.

That could be in Europe, the company's CEO told CNN.

"They thought March break was the flawless time for them to go over there, have fun", he said.

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The officials said the remains had been picked from the plane crash scene by health officials and police.

Southwest Airlines, the largest US domestic carrier, exclusively flies Boeing 737 aircraft and has 34 of the Max 8s in its fleet.

While the airline industry awaits answers on the safety of the Boeing 737 Max 8, there's a battle over who will analyze the "black boxes" from the weekend crash.

Mavropoulos, president of the International Solid Waste Association, a nonprofit organization, was travelling to Nairobi in Kenya to attend the annual assembly of the United Nations Environment Program, according to Athens News Agency.

October's Lion Air crash is also unresolved, but attention has focused so far on the role of a software system created to push the plane down as well as airline training and maintenance. It is tweaking the system created to prevent an aerodynamic stall if sensors detect that the plane's nose is pointed too high and its speed is too slow.

Boeing said it stands by the plane.

Ethiopian authorities have said it will take several days to identify the remains of the victims.

The victims came from more than 30 nations, and included almost two dozen UN staff.

The new variant of the 737, the world's most-sold modern passenger aircraft, was viewed as the likely workhorse for global airlines for decades and 4,661 more are on order.

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