Google’s Project Stream lets you play Assassin’s Creed in your browser

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Google wants to change that perception of what we are able to stream, from simple media to apps and now to even full AAA video games with Project Stream.

Should you be interested, Google is now looking for people to test its new platform and further makes note that "Project Stream is geared toward home internet connections capable of 25 megabits per second, and you must be 17 years or older and live in the U.S.to participate". As said services grow in popularity, it's no surprise to see Google enter the market for itself. Can Google slay the beast that has defeated so many others in the past? Officially announced on the Google blog here, the unimaginatively named Project Stream claims it can push high-end games from Google's servers directly onto your browser screen with minimal lag. In a way, Project Stream is similar in nature as per NVIDIA GeForce Now service. It's also only limited to users aged over 17 years, and those who live in the United States.

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Called Project Stream, it will let users stream games in real time to Google's Chrome browser. Rather than have players buy and maintain their own expensive gaming hardware, game streaming offloads that compute work to the cloud and streams down only what you need (a video feed) over the Internet. To put it through its paces, it will be using Assassin's Creed Odyssey upon release on October 5. These are issues that now make streaming games frustrating and a hurdle for many, considering the size and scope of larger, blockbuster games like the latest "Assassin's Creed". Better yet, Project Stream has a fairly short list of requirements, including "a reliable internet connection" (Google recommends 25 Mbps download speeds), accounts with both Google and Ubisoft, and of course, an installation of Chrome.

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