IPhone battery glitch spurs two federal probes

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USA authorities are investigating Apple's (AAPL) slowing of older iPhones, according to published reports.

The company acknowledged the probes late Tuesday after both The Wall Street Journal and Bloomberg reported the U.S. Justice Department and Securities and Exchange Commission were investigating how investors have been affected by Apple's handling of the situation.

Apple suggested that "About a year ago, we delivered a software update that improves power management during peak workloads to avoid unexpected shutdowns on certain iPhones with older batteries".

"Even if Apple's actions were indeed only meant to avoid unexpected shutdowns in older phones. there should have been better transparency with respect to these practices", Thune wrote. In an explanation, the company said it only took the action to prevent some aging batteries from failing and completely shutting devices down.

Apple may be pushing back major iOS feature updates in favor of stability upgrades, but it's still keen on getting iOS apps onto Mac computers this year, Axios reports. Last quarter, Apple sold 46.677 million iPhone units, up roughly 2.6% year-over-year. Older iPhones that haven't had a battery replacement tend to act differently from those that are brand new.

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"Our goal has always been to create products that our customers love", said Apple. For now, Apple is being said to be developing its iOS 11.3, which is supposed to hand over more controls of the handset's battery and performance settings to users. High consumer satisfaction ratings may mean that Apple's risks paid off, and may lead the Cupertino giant to return to its formerly high pace of innovation with its future models. Apple's statement does not reference any specific agency.

Apple plans to release an iPhone software update in the next few months with new features that let users monitor the health of their batteries and protect against slowdowns, the report noted.

However, more cynical types think that Apple was hamstringing its older phones to force their owners to upgrade.

This system isn't available elsewhere yet, allows customers with an iPhone 6 or more economical to reserve a battery on the internet and have Apple touch them if tribal is available in their favorite Apple Store.

As we promised to keep you updated on the previous "Apple Family Purchase issue", here we are with the updates. For the most part, though, Apple wants to make iPhones more responsive.

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