Bomber Gets Life in Prison for New York, New Jersey Attacks

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A man who set off bombs in two states, including a pressure cooker device that blasted shrapnel across a New York City block and injured 30, was sentenced Tuesday to multiple terms of life in prison. He is awaiting trial in New Jersey on those charges.

"It's inexplicable that anyone would do that intentionally", he said.

Rahimi, 30, did not express remorse for his crime, the BBC reported, but told the court he did not "harbor hate for anyone".

Afghan-born U.S. citizen Ahmad Khan Rahimi injured 30 people when one of the bombs exploded in Manhattan.

Using fingerprints found inside the unexploded devices, authorities tied the Afghan-born US citizen to a series of bombings that injured 30 across the area.

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Given a chance to speak, Rahimi, shackled at the ankles, portrayed himself as a victim, saying he came to America as a 7-year-old boy with no hatred for anyone and was raised by a father in a household where there was no mention of what his father experienced during the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan.

Federal prosecutors said in court papers that Rahami has not shown remorse and had tried to radicalize fellow prisoners at the federal jail in NY where he has been imprisoned since his arrest.

Mohammad Rahimi, told NBC New York on Monday that he told the Federal Bureau of Investigation in 2014 that he was anxious his son might have been radicalized.

Wearing blue prison smock and white cap Tuesday, Rahimi refuted these claims, telling the court that the fellow inmate was already "radicalized by Federal Bureau of Investigation agents when he was on the outside". He also ordered $562,803 in restitution. The day after the Chelsea explosion, Rahimi returned to New Jersey and left a backpack containing six pipe bombs in an Elizabeth, N.J., train station.

He said he considered Rahimi to be a danger to the community, citing the "hostile and threatening " nature of the bombings and the influence of "virulent anti-U.S." terrorist propaganda. "Committing terrorism may seem, from the darkest places of the internet and espoused in propaganda, as a higher calling". Rahimi was convicted by a jury in October of setting off weapons of mass destruction.

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