White House: Trump's slurred speech was caused by a dry throat

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Her comments came after speculation fueled by Trump's speech patterns near the end of Wednesday speech in which he formally recognized Jerusalem as Israel's capital.

During the speech, Trump appeared to stumble at the end of the phrase "God bless the United States".

Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders made the announcement in the wake of what she called "pretty ridiculous questions" about the president's health following a speech on moving the US embassy to Jerusalem Wednesday.

Noah wasted no time in critiquing the president on the gaffe, noting that "even more disturbing" than the Middle East conflict was watching "the conflict between Donald Trump's teeth and his tongue". "There's nothing to it", Shah said. "You know what it seemed like the whole time?" "I'm saying there's nothing to it".

Trump's speech sent Twitter into a frenzy with people questioning whether he had health problems, was suffering from issues with his medication, or possible issues with dentures.

Noah made the remarks after noticing that Trump had slurred his words a bit when announcing that the U.S.

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Senator Franken Thursday just before noon said, "I, of all people, am aware that there is some irony in the fact that I am leaving while a man who has bragged on tape about his history of sexual assault sits in the Oval Office".

Noah also went on to indicate that Trump must have been having trouble with his dentures and called for a "molar investigation". "Yeah. This is what's going on", Noah said.

Noah speculated Trump was wearing dentures.

Noah then suggested that people NOT start using the hashtag #DentureDonald.

"I really think that he is wearing a denture and that denture is either ill fitting or it is slipping out of his mouth and that is causing his slurred speech", Dr. Nancy Rosen, a dentist in New York City, told Inside Edition.

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