President Trump doesn't let up on criticism of San Juan mayor

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The president of the Puerto Rico Aqueduct and Sewer Authority, Elí Díaz Atienza, gave a breakdown of the water service restoration effort to San Juan radio station WIPR, saying water is running to about 55% of the city.

Cruz had been among the harshest critics of Trump's response to hurricanes Irma and Maria, which have killed at least 16 people and left millions across Puerto Rico without food, water and electricity in recent weeks.

Donald Trump has said officials in hurricane-hit Puerto Rico "want everything to be done for them" in an astonishing attack on Twitter.

President Donald Trump scoffed Sunday at "politically motivated ingrates" who had questioned his administration's commitment to rebuilding Puerto Rico after a pulverizing hurricane and said the federal government had done "a great job with the nearly impossible situation". This summer, in an interview with Harper's Bazaar Arabia, Kardashian said "anyone can run the USA better".

But FEMA Administrator Brock Long defended their efforts, telling ABC News that in 42 days, his team has registered almost three million people for relief since Hurricane Harvey hit Texas in August.

U.S. Senator Marco Rubio, a Republican, urged an end to the political fingerpointing.

"General Buchanan, a three-star general, has said that he doesn't have enough troops and he doesn't have enough equipment", the mayor commented, adding, "So who am I?"

But Maher offered a solution and said: 'Let's tell Trump that there are lots of black people kneeling in Puerto Rico, maybe he'll get focused on that'. "And the 700,000 New Yorkers who are proud Puerto Ricans, we will not forget what Puerto Rico is going through".

Maria pummeled Puerto Rico on September 20 as a very powerful Category 4 hurricane on the heels of Irma, with roof-ripping winds and torrential rains that caused widespread flooding and heavily damaged homes, roads and other infrastructure.

Meanwhile over 90% of the population remains without power, over 40% do not have clean drinking water, and thousands of homes and businesses have been destroyed. Meanwhile, the Federal Communications Commission said 90 percent of cell towers in the island were out of service, meaning residents couldn't connect with their loved ones and made it more hard for first responders.

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"They just don't have the resources", the mayor said of FEMA.

In response, Cruz wrote that people need help.

"I haven't heard what she said", he told reporters.

Carmen Miranda, 60, of Luquillo, is among those who has faced long lines for gasoline, medicine and supplies.

"It's really an honor and a privilege that we are able to go", she said.

Cruz, in response, said later Saturday morning that she'll "continue to do whatever I have to do" to get federal hurricane assistance. "It's just frightful, those lines".

Cruz was born and grew up in the San Juan.

"We can not get out of thin air things that we need".

On Saturday, she responded to Trump's tweeted comments, saying, "It's not about politics, it's not about petty comments, it's about moving forward, putting boots on the ground and saving lives".

FEMA director Brock Long admonished her for not being in closer contact with relief coordinators. The U.S. territory has been facing an economic collapse and debt crisis, which some say was exacerbated by the Jones Act. "We're doing whatever we can", Sandy Polemeni said.

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