Dianne Feinstein, oldest United States senator, announces reelection bid

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Feinstein, who was the mayor of San Francisco for a decade before her Senate career, has been among the most outspoken voices on issues like gun violence and torture during her long legislative tenure. Feinstein's social media strategy created brief confusion on Twitter, until her spokesperson confirmed the validity of the account.

Most elected Democrats are expected to support Feinstein, but at least one Democratic lawmaker from California has harshly denounced her. The No. 2 Senate Republican, John Cornyn of Texas, has said he's open to legislation and that he'd spoken with Judiciary Committee Chuck Grassley, who was interested in holding a hearing.

Her decision to run for reelection comes in the face of grumbling from progressives in California over some of the senator's recent remarks about President Donald Trump.

Feinstein said her narrowly-tailored proposal should be sufficient to earn bipartisan support, but so far, no Republican has signed on as a co-sponsor. Kevin de Leon, who is term-limited as the Senate president pro tempore, are also known to be angling for higher office.

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In a series of tweets posted after the announcement on Monday, Sanberg sought to make the case that Feinstein had been too deferential to Trump, and that with deep-blue California " leading the resistance" on the state level, "we need representatives willing to do the same in D.C".

Should Feinstein win, she would be 91 by the end of her term.

The rising liberal star Sen. "What Californians get from Dianne is someone who sticks to her principles and achieves results regardless of powerful opponents, from the assault weapons ban to the Central Intelligence Agency torture report".

Fewer than half of Californians say they want Feinstein to run for reelection, according to a poll released by the Public Policy Institute of California in September.

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