Trump signals he will declare opioids crisis a 'national emergency'

Share

The Governor of Guam, the U.S. territory threatened with attack by North Korea, has backed Donald Trump's fiery rhetoric toward the nuclear-armed nation, saying that a President who whole-heartedly embraces forceful retaliation over attacks on United States territory is "what I want".

"And I will tell you this - if North Korea does anything in terms of even thinking about" attacking the United States, its allies or "anybody that we love", Trump continued, "they should be very nervous".

"North Korea better get their act together", Trump said, "or they are going to be in trouble like few nations have ever been in trouble". This makes it very hard for North Korea to figure out what American policy actually is, and thus to know where they have to stop to avoid triggering a military conflict. "They will be met with fire and fury like the world has never seen", the president said in a short statement to reporters.

His team assumed that he would be asked about North Korea during a scheduled media appearance tied to a meeting the president was planning to hold at his golf club in Bedminster, New Jersey, about the opioid epidemic.

North Korea is considering a plan to simultaneously fire four intermediate-range ballistic missiles to areas around Guam through the sky above western Japan, state-run Korean Central News Agency reported on Thursday, quoting a senior military commander.

North Korea experienced several failures before a successful flight test in June previous year, after which the country's leader, Kim Jong-un, declared that his nation had the "sure capability to attack in an overall and practical way the Americans in the Pacific operation theatre".

Republicans and Democrats alike rightly criticized his "fire and fury" riff, while Trump's defenders argued that his tough talk and unpredictability were aimed at deterring North Korea and pressuring China to do more. Public statements are especially important signaling, because the U.S. doesn't have a direct line of communication with North Korea. Andrea Swift said she didn't report the alleged crime to police because the family wanted to keep the incident private, according to the AP. Guam is home to about 163,000 people and a US military base that includes a submarine squadron, an airbase and a Coast Guard group.

"No, I never said that", Gorka said in response to the anchor saying there was audio of his BBC interview.

The leader of the country, Kim Jong-un, has promised to continue the tests, drawing condemnation from the U.S. and its regional allies, South Korea and Japan.

More news: Dow streak of records ends amid US-North Korea tensions
More news: Trump Touts Achievements, Decries 'Fake News Suppression Polls' in Tweet
More news: Betty Shelby Has Been Hired At The Rogers County Sheriff's Office

Tillerson told reporters that the USA was looking to diplomacy to end North Korea's nuclear threat.

The prime minister says he discussed the threat with U.S. Vice President Mike Pence overnight.

A nuclear crisis with North Korea seems like a time when you'd want everyone in the U.S. administration on the same page.

Trump said the United States loses a lot of money on trade with China. "I think China can do a lot more, yes, China can".

"It's about time someone stood up for the people of our country", he added. It's not going to continue like that.

"We are watching the increasing rhetorical escalation regarding the Korean Peninsula with the greatest concern", German Foreign Ministry spokesman Martin Schaefer told reporters. Guam is more than 3,000 kilometres away from North Korea.

"We'll always consider negotiations". It also elaborated on a threat to attack the tiny US Pacific territory of Guam.

Only the secretary of defense, Gorka says, has the authority to speak about American decisions to use force.

Share