Guam's worries grow as tensions rise between US, North Korea

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The Philippine Consul General in Guam, Marciano De Borja, wants to reassure the thousands of Filipinos on island that Guam is now not in a state of emergency. And in June, the House Armed Services Committee passed an amendment to the 2018 National Defense Authorization Act that would require the secretary of defense to submit a report on how climate change could affect American military installations and combat requirements over the next 20 years.

It added that the plan would be put into practice at any moment, once leader Kim Jong Un made a decision, which involves firing medium- to long-range rockets at Guam, which is home to a strategic outpost of the USA military that includes a submarine squadron, an air base and a Coast Guard unit.

A social media post stating a commanding officer briefed military personnel on a North Korea missile attack is false.

But Guam's topography is no guarantee that its climate adaptation projects would be effective over the long term, she added.

The island remains on alert, she said, but its government and its people have steeled themselves for the worst.

Many have loved ones stationed there and are patiently watching to see what may happen next. "We're just trying not to think about it too much".

For the 24 thousand who are dual citizens, De Borja says they will be prioritized for evacuation, but only if such a time were to occur.

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Guam has been occupied by foreign governments for over 400 years, including Japan and Spain and numerous island's people clamor for independence. "I'm really not concerned about it".

"Basically, we established a quick communication network which is the first thing that we have to put in place so that we will be able to warn them (Filipinos) about the impending threat", he said. She noted that similar threats in 2013 led to an advanced missile defense system - known as THAAD, for Terminal High Altitude Area Defense - to be permanently placed on the island as a deterrent.

"I think people are just stunned and really don't know what to think", Todd Thompson said.

Burger said the news is prompting his family to ask him when he's coming home. "And I don't think they're going to accept the status quo", Gregory Elich of the US-based Solidarity Committee for Democracy and Peace in Korea told Radio Sputnik's Loud & Clear on Tuesday. Guam is a USA territory with roughly 160,000 U.S. citizens.

"There's nothing in the world other than God that would make me relocate and move away from my home". One third of the island is owned by the US military.

"If our past generations dealt with it, so can we", said Santos, the Guam Museum employee, who was born and raised on the island.

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