Don't mess with Phil: Bullied Indiana boy gets biker escort to school

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WANE Channel 15 reported that Phil Mick rode on the back of a motorcycle to classes flanked by 49 other motorcyclists who were there as a show of force against bullies who have persistently targeted Mick in school. The motorcycle community came out to show our support for Phil and all kids that get bullied. "I got a guardian angel watching over me".

The Indiana 6 grader embarked on his first day of school with a band of bikers backing him up.

Phil called the bikers his brothers and sisters, and was eager to join the motorcade for his first motorcycle ride, Mick said. "It's just insane, it's an epidemic", said Brent Warfield who organized the motorcycle ride. He told her he was bullied for being overweight.

The motorcycles' roar was hard to miss as they arrived, Principal Matt Vince said, recalling how the sound reverberated off the exterior brick walls. "When Phil talked about committing suicide next year, Brent stepped in and wanted to help", Tammy said. "He thanked the community, saying, "(If) it weren't for all the Big Hearted Bikers and loving, giving community. the things I do would not be possible".

He's been working to raise awareness about bullying and teen suicide, so he made a decision to organize a special ride for Phil on his first day of middle school.

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Matt Vince - the principal of DeKalb Middle School - said the boisterous roar of the motorcycles was impossible to ignore as they descended upon the school, adding that it vibrated off the school's brick walls.

"We're coming together to say enough is enough", he said. "And they did it in a positive way".

His mother Tammy said she suspected he was being bullied after he came home one day with bumps and bruises.

Taking a stand against bullying is important for Warfield because he said it can sometimes lead to teen suicide. "We want to know about it", he said.

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