US House Approves Spending Bill To Fund Donald Trump's Mexico Border Wall

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The bill largely funds defense and veteran programs, along with Department of Energy and legislative operations.

The $827 billion package passed by the House through 235-192 votes has a provision of $1.6 billion for the building of the border, which Trump believes is crucial to prevent illegal immigration and smuggling of drugs inside the United States.

Congress is up against an October 1 deadline - the start of a new fiscal year - for either passing spending bills or temporarily extending funding at current-year levels to give negotiators more time to come to agreements. - As Congress prepares to vote on whether to fund the further construction of a wall along the U.S. -Mexico border, bishops of dioceses along both sides of the border have been outspoken against such a policy.

Trump had campaigned for president by repeatedly promising to build a wall on the border.

If Senate Republicans try to force wall funding into the budget, Trump might get his wish.

The $1.6 billion is allocated for the construction of three segments of the wall on the U.S. border with Mexico, including $784 million for 32 miles of new border fencing and $498 million for 28 miles of levee wall in the Rio Grande Valley in Texas; another $251 million would go to building back-up fencing in the heavily fortified San Diego area, AP reported. The President said during the campaign, he said, 'I promised a wall.

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That's something the White House might actually favor.

Furthermore, Lowey noted that Pentagon funding would run into a technical problem as it breaches a cap on defence spending by $72 billion.

The beefed up defence spending would allow the Pentagon to continue military activities in Iraq, Afghanistan and other trouble spots and hire more troops while providing soldiers with a 2.4 percent pay raise.

But most of the sweeping Pentagon increases - which total about $60 billion above current levels and nearly $30 billion higher than Trump's budget - would evaporate next year unless there's a bipartisan agreement to raise budget "caps" set by a 2011 budget pact.

But greater resistance is anticipated in the Senate, where Republicans hold just 52 of the 100 seats, and 60 votes are needed to pass the corresponding budget bill.

Missile defence would also gain 14 more THAAD interceptors made by Lockheed Martin Co.

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