What Would Happen If Trump Fired Robert Mueller?

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Pointing to Sessions' comments that accusing him of colluding with Russians was a "detestable lie", Republicans would do well to follow his tone and intensity, said Gingrich. Even so, some are calling for Mueller to step aside, and others are encouraging the president to fire Mueller.

"The president is going to seek the advice of his counsel and inside the government as well as outside", he said.

Lawmakers were eager to ask Rosenstein about whether the special counsel was safe from being fired by the president after Ruddy made his provocative comments on PBS's "NewsHour" that Trump was "weighing" whether to dismiss Mueller.

Rosenstein said the attorney general would be the only one who could fire Mueller. Rosenstein said he hadn't.

But Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, the administration official who actually has the authority to fire Mueller, threw cold water on that prospect in Senate testimony Tuesday morning. And they didn't agree to come and then cancel at the last minute and send their second in command in their stead, because the members of this committee may have questions they may not want to answer. Legally-speaking, experts say that that job belongs to Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, though Trump could order Rosenstein to fire Mueller.

Rosenstein said "no, I have not", when asked by Sen.

He has always been widely respected by many in Washington from both sides of the aisle, with many lawmakers praising Deputy Attorney General Rob Rosenstein's pick. Representative Adam Schiff, the Democratic ranking member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, which is overseeing its own probe into the Russian Federation matter, tweeted, "If President fired Bob Mueller, Congress would immediately re-establish independent counsel and appoint Bob Mueller".

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Press secretary Sean Spicer pushed back on Ruddy's comments, noting in a statement that the CEO of conservative website Newsmax did not speak to President Trump on a recent White House visit - though Ruddy never contended that he did, and Spicer did not refute that the president was considering firing Mueller. The attorney general is expected to be closely questioned about his contacts with Kislyak and his role in last month's firing Federal Bureau of Investigation director James Comey.

Ryan said the smartest thing for the president to do would be to let the investigation continue and be vindicated.

On ABC, Gingrich said Mueller's team of lawyers are "bad people" and it is "delusional" to think Mueller's team could be fair to Trump. "I know. I wrote the rules".

He explained Tuesday to the Senate panel that his decision was based on a Justice Department regulation dictating that 'employees should not participate in investigations of a campaign if they served as a campaign advisor'.

New Hampshire Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, the subcommittee's top Democrat, said she also was "troubled" by Sessions' cancellation. In 1973, Nixon turned to the third-ranking Justice official, Solicitor General Robert Bork, who fired Cox in his capacity as acting attorney general.

Leahy told Rosenstein "you are not the witness who should be behind this table". "But best we can figure out, he couldn't anyway", said Rep. Chris Collins, Trump's liaison to Congress.

Executing a flawless 180-degree turn, Newt Gingrich, one of President Donald Trump's top media surrogates has begun attacking the legitimacy of Robert Mueller, the special counsel who has been appointed to oversee the federal investigation into Russia's involvement in the 2016 presidential election.

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