U.S. intelligence chiefs decline to discuss Trump contacts

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US intelligence chiefs have refused to comment on whether President Donald Trump asked them to curb an FBI-led investigation into contacts between his election campaign and Moscow.

The Senate intelligence committee is back in the national spotlight for two days of blockbuster hearings and following news that relations between President Donald Trump and Attorney General Jeff Sessions had reached a boiling point surrounding his recusal from the Justice Department's Russian Federation investigation. But Rogers said he had never been directed to do anything illegal, immoral or inappropriate during his time as NSA director while Coats said he had never felt pressured to intervene in the shaping of intelligence.

The conversations with Coats and Rogers took place in the wake of Comey testifying on March 20 that the FBI was investigating possible coordination between the Trump campaign and Russian operatives.

Before senators get to questions on whether Trump pressured Comey to kill his investigation of former National Security Michael Flynn, they're going to dig in on whether Trump pressured Coats and Rogers to rebut Comey. "I served on the committee here and often saw that information that we had discussed had been reported but it wasn't always accurate", Coats said.

National Security Agency Director Adm. Michael Rogers appears before a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing about the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, June 7, 2017, in Washington. McCabe and Rosenstein said they had not spoken to the White House, while Rogers said he and Coats did not receive a "definitive answer" to the question.

Mr Coats himself will give evidence to the Committee hearing later today.

Heinrich said Coats applied that standard "selectively", but the intelligence chief insisted he would not share with the public conversations he had with the president.

Comey is expected to dispute Trump's claim that the then-FBI chief told him multiple times that he was not under investigation, CNN reported, citing sources familiar with Comey's thinking.

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And given the limited information they shared with the Senate's investigative committee on Russian Federation on Wednesday, Trump's top intelligence officials seem to be residing in that nuance.

Warner said he was "disappointed" with the officials' answers. I'm simply asking did that conversation occur? Richard Burr of North Carolina, said that executive branch officials have the option of briefing the committee or congressional leaders in a classified setting. Comey added he'd never before had a request for loyalty due to the fact that the position of Federal Bureau of Investigation director was established to prevent an individual from feeling like he owed loyalty to a specific president. The president has even threatened to live-tweet the proceedings, White House staffers have told reporters. In addition to Coats, Rogers and Rosenstein, Acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe also testified.

The directors of national intelligence and the National Security Agency say they are in discussions with the White House about whether their conversations with President Donald Trump are protected by executive privilege.

"I have never felt pressured to intervene in the Russian Federation investigation in any way", he said.

"I think your unwillingness to answer a very basic questions speaks volumes", Heinrich replied. As Rachel noted on last night's show, Coats and Rogers refused to provide senators with the information sought by the committee.

The most awkward moment might have come toward the end of the open session, when there was visible confusion about a line of questioning from Sen.

Making it clear that he would not indicate which scenario was the real one, the official said that in both cases the intelligence officials had reason to stay quiet today.

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