Sens. Susan Collins, Rand Paul express doubts about Senate health care bill

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Former President Barack Obama's signature law is usually associated with subsidized insurance markets like HealthCare.gov.

In the years since Obamacare's passage in 2010, the number of American children without insurance has sunk rapidly. Trump earlier attacked Democrats for their "slam" on the healthcare proposal. He has considerable firepower to win votes, by guaranteeing amendments that would address the concerns of individual Republican senators, playing on their loyalty to him and their fealty to conservative voters still demanding an end to the Affordable Care Act.

The Senate bill is similar to the House bill but includes additional funding to stabilize the Obamacare health insurance exchanges and, so far, does not contain a provision that would penalize people for not having health care coverage.

"If we get to impasse, if we go to a bill that is more repeal and less big government programs, yes I'll consider partial repeal", Paul said on ABC. Republicans say reining in Medicaid spending would force states to focus on those who need it most, though moderates worry that the cuts would yank coverage from needy residents and cripple the fight against opioid addiction.

The Senate proposal would affect those now on Medicaid, contradicting what Spicer said, although the full extent of the bill's effects may not be clear for years.

"It would be so great if the Democrats and Republicans could get together, wrap their arms around it and come up with something that everybody's happy with", the president said.

"For my part, I'm very concerned about the cost of insurance for older people with serious chronic illnesses and the impact of the Medicaid cuts on our state governments, the most vulnerable people in our society, and health care providers such as our rural hospitals and nursing homes, most of whom are very dependent on the Medicaid program".

As U.S. Senate Republicans prepare for a possible vote on their newly released health care bill, medical professionals and others opposed to the plan joined Missouri Democratic Sen.

"I do think this is a crisis and I think it's all hands on deck", McCaskill said.

Johnson has said the measure leaves too much of Obamacare in place and would not lower premiums to make health care less expensive.

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"We've a very good plan, " Trump said in an interview broadcast Sunday.

Sen. Susan Collins of ME says she thinks getting the votes needed in the Senate this week to pass a Republican bill to replace the Affordable Care Act could be very hard.

Politically, then, it's very hard to see a clear constituency for this bill, apart from the mostly wealthy voters who will appreciate its rollback of Obamacare's tax increases.

An outside political group aligned with the White House, America First Policies, said it is planning an advertising campaign targeting Heller for his opposition to the bill. "They get nothing under the ACA", said Larry Levitt, of the Kaiser Health Foundation.

The health care bill could underscore the perils of the president's poor job approval ratings, which have hovered around 40 percent this year.

Trump took to Twitter on Saturday to criticize the Affordable Care Act and Democrats who are opposed to the Republican repeal bill. Medicaid provides health care not just for the indigent and disabled but also for the working poor - low-wage employees who can not afford health insurance, even the plans offered through their jobs.

The Senate bill - once promised as a top-to-bottom revamp of the health bill passed by the House last month - instead maintains its structure, with modest adjustments.

"I don't think they're that far off".

Sen. Susan M. Collins of ME is also on the fence, saying she is anxious that older Americans will have to pay more and that she won't be able to strip out a part of the bill that defunds Planned Parenthood over its abortion practice.

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