Mercury rises as Met office issues second highest heatwave alert

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Pictured are Emily Thompson and Karen Sinden.

If you're one of those people you're in luck as temperatures is expected to drop over the coming days in the Grimsby area.

"We can expect more warm and humid nights this week as the very warm weather will remain until Friday".

This week will see temperatures in the high 20°C's or even low 30°C's for many across England and Wales, Met Office forecasters have said.

The heat is forecast to keep temperatures in the South and South East some 10C (50F) above the usual average for this time of year.

"I would say we are in the midst of a heatwave".

In response to the extreme hot weather, Simon Bottery, director of policy at Independent Age, the older people's charity said: "Older people can suffer adverse effects on their health during the hot weather and can be more vulnerable to heatstroke, heat exhaustion and dehydration".

"That's why we're urging everyone to keep an eye on those you know who may be at risk this summer".

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Unusual levels of UV are also being recorded in the United Kingdom at the moment - with the strength of the UV in some spots being as high as that in Cyprus and Gibraltar.

The weather expert warned that it is important to take precautions against the sun especially as the Summer Solstice, the longest day of the year, is this week.

It will be another fine day with nearly unbroken sunshine and light winds.

It will be a fine end to the day with plenty of evening sunshine.

"Night-time temperatures will remain warm and humid for many areas making sleeping conditions hard for some".

A 10-day scorcher in 2003 resulted in 2,000 heat-related deaths and another hot spell in 2006 killed 680.

There is very little sun expected on Tuesday - but with likely cloud coverage across the sky, humidity levels are set to rise rapidly.

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