Britain says Brexit talks to start Monday

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The announcement by Andrea Leadsom suggests that Prime Minister Theresa May and the Northern Ireland-based Democratic Unionist Party have struck an agreement or are close to one.

Arriving to a meeting with his counterparts in the 28-country EU, Hammond said his "clear view" is "we should prioritize protecting jobs, protecting economic growth and protecting prosperity as we enter those negotiations and take them forward".

The EU's executive Commission said in a statement Friday that the first round of negotiations in Brussels will be part of a "sequenced approach to the talks".

With 318 seats in the House of Commons, the Conservatives remain the biggest single victor, but still fall behind securing the 326-mark of seats for a majority as they had before the snap election.

Fighting for her political survival, May has been trying to strike a deal with a small Northern Irish Protestant party to avoid a second election that could delay Brexit talks and damage the $2.5 trillion economy.

Following the talks, Sinn Fein president Gerry Adams said the party would not stand for any Conservative-DUP arrangement which compromised British government impartiality in Northern Ireland.

"We want to see a Brexit that works for everybody, not just in Northern Ireland from my perspective but in the Republic of Ireland as well, so it is about a sensible Brexit", Foster told reporters. The talks are taking place three months after Prime Minister Theresa May formally triggered the two-year Brexit timetable.

On Monday, the European Commission insisted it was "fully prepared and ready for the negotiations to start" the process.

Among topics that need to be agreed upon is the status of United Kingdom citizens living and working in the EU, as well as that of European nationals doing the same in Britain. She has really hacked off the parliamentary party for obvious reasons.

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In a sign of confusion at the very top of government, May's office late Saturday had to backtrack on a statement that it had reached a deal with the DUP over forming a loose alliance to support a new government.

The prospect of Brexit has sent a wave of concern through Britain's business sector.

Britain's Brexit ministry said on Friday that no deal could be struck on exiting unless the future relationship with the bloc was taken into account.

The Times also reported that party members who had campaigned to keep Britain in the European Union were likely to have a candidate lined up to replace May, with interior minister Amber Rudd the likely option.

"We're still in uncharted waters today and we don't know exactly how it's going to look, so we've got to plan ahead".

He wouldn't be drawn on whether he supported Britain's continued membership in the single market and said May's minority government will negotiate in a "pragmatic" manner, striving for a solution that works for both sides.

Only if "sufficient progress" is made on those thorny topics will he allow discussions to turn to the trade deal that Mrs May wants.

"And actually, getting over the fence, there might be some fresh grass out there".

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