Saudi, UAE pledge US$100 million to Ivanka Trump womens' fund

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US Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross was caught snoozing during President Donald Trump's speech on the "crisis of Islamic extremism" in Riyadh during his first state visit overseas.

After Trump landed in Tel Aviv, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu expressed "hope that one day an Israeli prime minister will be able to fly from Tel Aviv to Riyadh". While King Salman appeared happy to greet the visitors, a Trump tweet from 2015 suggested he would be offended. The fund is Ivanka Trump's brainchild. The president and Kushner visited one side, while the first daughter and first lady visited a portion of the site reserved for women.

Since then, just about everyone has been wondering what exactly was the glowing orb that Trump had his hands on in Saudi Arabia.

Speaking a day after Iran re-elected the relatively moderate Hassan Rouhani as president, Mr Trump risked reigniting tensions with Tehran by accusing the country of bearing responsibility for instability in the region. The U.S. has never recognized Israeli sovereignty over parts of the Old City seized in the 1967 war. Trump also spoke about the need for peace and cooperation among Middle Eastern countries to combat terrorism. White House national security adviser HR McMaster seem to confirm he would not use the phrase ahead of the visit.

USA secretary of state Rex Tillerson, speaking to reporters on board Air Force One, said the U.S. could provide clarifications to Israel about the disclosure but said: "I don't know that there's anything to apologise for".

But addressing the leaders of 55 Muslim-majority countries, Trump said the meeting marked a "new chapter" that would bring lasting benefits for citizens of the United States and those of the countries being represented at the meeting.

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When he met Abbas earlier this month in Washington, he stopped shortly of explicitly recommitting his administration to a two-state solution to the decades-old conflict, a long-standing foundation of USA policy.

Tillerson was asked aboard Air Force One if the president still believes Islam "hates us", as he declared repeatedly during the campaign.

Gulf Arab countries long have been suspicious about Iran, and the Obama administration's nuclear negotiations furthered their worries about Iran's regional intentions.

While Israeli officials cheered Trump's election, some are now wary of the tougher line he has taken on settlements: urging restraint but not calling for a full halt to construction.

With controversy surrounding alleged ties between his campaign and Russian Federation looming in the U.S., President Trump arriving in Saudi Arabia where he received a lavish royal welcome.

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