President Trump to meet 4 candidates for post of Federal Bureau of Investigation director

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Frank Keating was interviewed Wednesday by President Donald Trump for the FBI's top job but said he does not expect to be chosen.

Trump said he could make a "fast decision" on replacing Comey - possibly before he leaves Friday for Saudi Arabia, the start of his first overseas trip since taking office on January 20. He has said he could name a director before he departs. And asked if Lieberman, the Democrat-turned-independent senator from CT was a top candidate, Trump said yes.

Lieberman gave reporters a thumbs-up as he left the White House on Wednesday and said he and Trump had a "good meeting". Frank Keating and former top Federal Bureau of Investigation official Richard McFeely, according to press secretary Sean Spicer. McCabe was tapped to become acting director after Trump dismissed Comey on May 9. And seeing as how the president - who is not happy with Mueller's new gig - must choose Comey's replacement rather quickly, they're about to get a lot more. "It's special", Trump said later Thursday at a joint news conference with Santos.

Lieberman endorsed Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign, but has spoken warmly at times since the November election.

President Trump said Monday that the search for a successor to Comey was "moving rapidly".

The Senate must confirm Trump's candidate for the job. Lieberman, 75, has served as attorney general in CT but has no federal law-enforcement experience, unlike past FBI directors.

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., called Lieberman a "pillar of credibility." Sen.

The media won't be thrilled with someone like Joe Lieberman, who's considered the front-runner.

Some of the appeal of Lieberman to Trump may be in a personal connection.

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A November 25 news release from Trump's transition team quoted Lieberman praising Trump's selection of K.T. McFarland as deputy national security adviser.

President Donald Trump is expected to pick former Democratic Sen.

President Trump and his inner circle don't know how to judge Lieberman's past as a Democrat and independent. Lieberman lost his 2006 Democratic primary bid but won Senate re-election as a third party candidate.

Lieberman spoke with various Bush advisers, including then-chief of staff Andrew Card and national security adviser Condoleezza Rice, about the position before he finally made a decision to remain in the Senate. John McCain, and did not seek re-election in 2012. He has served as co-chairman of No Labels, a centrist group that promotes bipartisanship.

Keating served as governor of Oklahoma from 1995-2003 and was appointed to the OU Board of Regents in March. He had previously served as a U.S. Attorney in Oklahoma and was a top Justice Department official under Ronald Reagan.

Keating told The Oklahoman he does not expect to be chosen.

"If they wanted me, I certainly would be honored, but I really don't think that's going to happen", Keating, 73, told The Oklahoman after his interview at the White House.

Meanwhile, the FBI continues its investigation into alleged collusion between the Trump campaign and Russian Federation, even though no evidence has emerged to date.

Several other candidates have withdrawn from consideration, including Rep. Trey Gowdy and Sen.

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