New homes must be marketed to Britons first, say Liberal Democrats

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Someone is going to have the final say over the Brexit deal.

The Liberal Democrats nosedived in the 2015 election after five years as the minor coalition partner alongside the centre-right Conservatives, but they are hoping to regain voters with their pro-Europe promises.

The party also intends to expand renewable energy, aiming to generate 60% of electricity from renewables by 2030, restoring government support for solar PV and onshore wind in appropriate locations (helping meet climate targets at least cost) and building more electricity interconnectors to underpin this higher reliance on renewables.

The upcoming United Kingdom elections are unlikely to deliver enough certainty about what life will look like post-Brexit, said the former MEP and ALDE leader in an interview with EURACTIV.com, adding that no winners will emerge from the process.

Mrs May's Ukip-inspired "hard Brexit" approach of taking Britain out of the single market and customs union is "a time bomb under our economy" which will wreck Britain's future for decades to come, warned the Liberal Democrat leader.

"In the biggest fight for the future of our country in a generation, Jeremy Corbyn's Labour has let you down by voting with Theresa May on Brexit - not against her".

In terms of seats that's almost impossible - they only have 9 and they won't get many more without, at the very least, getting voters to know them and like them. The Party has some ties to the resources industry through Ray Georgeson, chair of the Resource Association, who a Lib Dem town councillor in Otley, West Yorkshire and a board member of the Green Liberal Democrats. "This election is your opportunity to change Britain's future - by changing the opposition".

The Liberal Democrats would also invest £6.9bn in schools and colleges over the next Parliament, funded in part with not lowering corporation tax levels.

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The manifesto also called for a scrapping of dividend tax relief.

They have also proposed legalising and taxing cannabis across the UK.

At the heart of the 95 page document is a pledge to raise income tax on all earners by 1p to pay for extra spending on health and social care and a pledge to hold a second European Union referendum.

The manifesto says that in the long term, Lib Dems want a dedicated "health and care tax" to fund the NHS, possibly created through reforming National Insurance.

The problem is that though people may struggle to think who leads the party or what they stand for they have no problem remembering broken promises. "To be clear, Theresa May's Conservative Party is on course to win this election", possibly in a "landslide", Tim Farron wrote in the manifesto.

Scottish Labour election coordinator James Kelly said the Lib Dems had "nothing new to offer".

The Conservative Party has surged in the polls in recent months, now leading with 49% of the vote according to a YouGov poll published on May 12.

The party believes its penny-in-the-pound income tax increase would "give the NHS and social care services the cash they need", and allow a reduction in waiting times for mental health care to match those for physical health care. Where the Liberal Democrats are fighting every step of the way, Labour is holding Theresa May's hand as she jumps off the cliff edge of a hard Brexit.

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