Macron's parliamentary candidates gather in Paris


French President-elect Emmanuel Macron's start-up party on Thursday announced a list of 428 candidates, majority political unknowns, to fight parliamentary elections that will determine his chances of putting his program into action.

As secretary-general of the president-elect's Republic on the Move party, Ferrand is working to secure the parliamentary majority in June legislative elections that Macron will need to govern effectively.

"I think that we have made progress and we have built a solid and balanced accord", Bayrou told journalists after the meeting late on Friday.

Ferrand said the choices marked "the definitive return of citizens to the heart of our political life".

The list prompted a furious reaction from François Bayrou, a veteran centrist who backed Mr Macron at a critical moment in his presidential campaign.

More news: North Korea fires unidentified projectile: South Korea military
More news: Wizards' Oubre: Olynyk hits led to outburst
More news: President Buhari describes the releases of 82 Chibok girls as democracy gift

Macron still needs to select 148 candidates for the 577-seat parliament and the party said its door is open to politicians from other parties to join. In a meeting with members of his campaign team on February 22, Macron told them that he was about to get an endorsement from Francois Bayrou, a centrist former three-time presidential candidate whose support helped boost Macron's campaign.

Thursday's publication of Macron's partial candidate list produced the first sign of tension within his camp since he was elected. "There was no set agreement", he said on BFM TV, adding that there was still room for manoeuver given there are more constituencies to be assigned.

Macron, a former economy minister in Hollande's government, has so far failed to attract centrist members of the rightwing Republicans party, but still believes some will cross over before next Wednesday.

Macron formed his own party only last year, and his election victory over the National Front's Marine Le Pen on Sunday has destroyed the dominance of the centre-left and centre-right parties which have governed France for almost 60 years.