Ex-CIA chief shines light on nexus of Trump, Russia

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Trump did so after top FBI officials, including now-fired Director James Comey, reportedly refused a White House request to knock down news stories on possible Trump campaign-Russia links, and after Comey reportedly declined Trump's entreaty to end the investigation into former national security adviser Michael Flynn.

"I hope Gen.Flynn decides to comply with our Intel Committee subpoena to produce business documents".

Yet even as the public case for such an investigation continues to strengthen, revelations about Trump's apparent attempts to challenge the FBI's inquiry into these questions continue to roll in.

The only option that is not on the table, Burr said, would be immunity.

"Anybody who gets close to this investigation loses their job or ends up in a hard position", he said, before listing Flynn, Comey, fired acting Attorney General Sally Yates and Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

The Times said some of the Russian officials bragged about ties to Mr Flynn, and others thought they could use Mr Manafort's association with former Ukrainian president Viktor Yanukovych, who led a pro-Russian political party, to their advantage. If Flynn does not comply, Burr threatened him with a contempt of Congress charge.

Former Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) director John Brennan said on Tuesday that he became increasingly concerned last summer over contacts between US President Donald Trump's campaign officials and Moscow, as a Russian effort to interfere with the US presidential election became evident.

The report says the Russian officials thought Manafort and Flynn could be used to influence Trump's views on Russia.

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When asked why he had turned down Flynn's offer to testify in exchange for immunity from prosecution, Burr said the committee had discussed that and decided against it.

The special counsel, former FBI Director Robert Mueller, is overseeing an investigation into Russia's meddling in the election and whether there was any collusion with Trump associates.

Schiff, the ranking member on the House intelligence committee, said that Flynn had declined to come before the House panel or provide documents, citing his Fifth Amendment rights, as he had to subpoenas from the Senate intelligence committee. He also said he personally told a senior Russian security official in August that Russia needed to stop interfering in the US democratic process.

In its report, the New York Times said some Russians boasted about how well they knew Flynn, who was subsequently named Trump's national security adviser before being dismissed less than a month after the Republican took office. The committee asked for a specific list of documents from the businesses, arguing that corporations are not endowed with Fifth Amendment privileges.

Meanwhile, Page said Wednesday that details are still being worked out about his testimony before the House intelligence committee next month.

Separately, ABC News reported that Carter Page, a former foreign policy adviser to Trump's presidential campaign, would testify on June 6 before the House of Representatives Intelligence Committee.

The intelligence panels are among several congressional committees looking into the allegations involving links between Russian Federation and Trump's November 8 victory. "I did not collude with the Russians to influence the elections".

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