Everything you need to know about the 'WannaCrypt' ransomware attack

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Noida cyber cell asked its residents to avoid clicking on any mail from unknown sources to prevent attacks from WannaCry Ransomware.

Using antivirus software will at least protect you from the most basic, well-known viruses by scanning your system against the known fingerprints of these pests. Updating software will take care of some vulnerability.

In Great Britain, as the ransomware infections cascaded through scores of hospitals, doctors' offices, and ambulance companies on Friday, patients were diverted away from emergency rooms, caretakers were left without access to important information, and the government was forced to declare a "major incident", cautioning residents that local health services could become overwhelmed.

EternalBlue could compromise all versions of Windows through a networking bug in SMBv1, and is the attack the WannaCry ransomware used to infect machines.

The bank said the attack, which exploited "a flaw" in the Windows operating system, illustrates just how many businesses have delayed upgrading their operating systems to Windows 10.

Lawrence Abrams, a New York-based blogger who runs BleepingComputer.com, says many organizations don't install security upgrades because they're anxious about triggering bugs, or they can't afford the downtime.

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Still, since the attack has making headlines, the Internet is full of organizations and people providing guidance about safe use of technology. It also appears to be able to spread to other computers outside corporate networks. Others subsequently confirmed the Google researcher's work. The virus essentially encrypted files of the affected computer, demanding the user payment of $300 in bitcoin to regain access to these files.

"Users of infected computers found their data held hostage with unbreakable encryption".

The patch protected newer Windows systems and computers that had enabled Windows Update to apply it, but not older versions for which it no longer provides support. It can't be overstated that the choice to let older versions of Windows lapse into a condition of permanent insecurity is as much a business strategy as an engineering decision, and one that leaves Microsoft customers in the lurch when something like WannaCry breaks loose.

Computers and networks that hadn't recently updated their systems are still at risk because the ransomware is lurking.

If you have a recent backup, restore from it: Ransomware is worthless to a hacker if a user has a backup. However, provided the severity of the situation, if the company must recover certain critical data which is essential for their operations, they might have to resort to paying the ransom.

CMIT Solutions delivers this kind of protection to many of our clients. However, as of now, there is no patch for these older operating systems for the EsteemAudit vulnerability.

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